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@growitmobile

Every animal needs some sort of cover. Not all of them need to be as fancy as this #toadabode, but when plotting out your #Garden4Wildlife it’s important to keep plants in mind that animals use to build their own houses. Native trees and grasses are great examples of natural building materials for critters. May is Garden for Wildlife month. We've partnered with the National Wildlife Federation to celebrate. Join us by posting your Garden for Wildlife photos on GrowIt! With the hashtag #Garden4Wildlife! #Nativeplants #Sustainability #Cover #GrowIt! #garden #wildlife #toad #amphibians #home #habitat #animals #conservation

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@beesponsible

Celebrating 45 years, @nationalwildlife's Garden for Wildlife movement has restored over 2.5 million acres of habitat. 🐝🦋🐦 You can help by joining our #dontkillmybuzz efforts that directly support this program.⠀ ⠀ “When you make simple changes to your outdoor spaces – from whole landscaped areas to a few planters – you create stepping stones that help reconnect habitats for wildlife across the country.” — Mary Phillips, Senior Director of Garden for Wildlife ⠀ ⠀ #gardenforwildlifemonth #garden4wildlife #gardenforwildlife #conservationheroes #habitatrestoration #nationalwildlifefederation #dontkillmybuzz #beesponsible

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@erichernandez226

Another #zinnia from Landon’s mixed @loweshomeimprovement seed pack. Every plant has different color #flowers . The #zebrabutterfly are loving them #pollination #garden4wildlife at Coral Springs, Florida

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@greenstreetgardensnova

Cardinal flowers have arrived!

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@wearebloom_

Shout out during #Garden4Wildlife month to Houston, a #Plant Keeper at the @jacksonvillezoo, who gardens for wildlife everyday!

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@erichernandez226

Grown from #seed from a pack that my son picked up from @loweshomeimprovement Literally looks like someone took a #paintbrush to it. #Bees 🐝 and #butterflies 🦋 have been having a field day with them. Fertilized with @osmocotegarden plant food. #polliNATION #garden4wildlife #zinnia #flowers #gardening #garden4wildlife #plantsofinstagram #ponyfony_flowers

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@beesponsible

Test your bee knowledge with @nationalwildlife's quiz: #linkinbio — then comment below with your score! 🐝⠀ ・・・⠀ #Repost @nationalwildlife with @get_repost⠀ ・・・⠀ Bees are an incredibly important group of wildlife. The service they provide by pollinating both our agricultural crops as well as wild plants is critical for our food supply and for maintaining healthy ecosystems upon which all species, including us, rely.⠀ But, how much do you actually know about these industrious insects? Take our Beesponsible quiz (link in bio ⬆️) and find out!⠀ Here’s a hint for one of the questions: Long-horned bees + squash bees do not live communally 🐝⠀ For more information on @Beesponsible, how you can help bees, and how to participate in a fun social media campaign to support the National Wildlife Federation’s work including the Garden for Wildlife program, visit Beesponsible.com and follow @Beesponsible on social media.⠀ #bees #beesponsible #gardens #garden4wildlife #insects #pollinators #quiz #wildlife #squashbees #honeybees #bumblebees #masonbees #longhornedbees #sweatbees #nests #facts #wildlifefacts #spring #nature #TuesdayThoughts

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@growitmobile

Nom Nom Nom! It’s important to remember that critters get hungry too! Food is vital for any habitat. When planting a  #Garden4Wildlife try using plants that are known animal food sources. It might even help to keep them away from the plants that you don’t necessarily want them eating. For ideas visit this project from the @nationalwildlife federation on GrowIt! https://profiles.growitmobile.com/projects/84780 This project is for the Southeastern Region, but there's a project for everyone! #Sustainability  #GrowIt#Pollinator  #pollination  #garden #wildlife #butterfly #echinacea

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@andyscottcs

I find Dioecious plants so interesting...meet Mr. & Mrs. Meadow Rue (Thalictrum dioicum) love these plants as a nice foliage for the garden border #nativegarden #garden4wildlife at East Bloomington, Minneapolis, Minnesota

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@growitmobile

It's #Garden4Wildlife Month! What kinds of wildlife have you seen this year? It's important to remember that our Gardens were habitats first.... and sometimes the inhabitants are there to lend us a hand. Like this dude. This Mantid preys on insects that are often considered garden pests. GrowIt! community member 'sunlovin' snapped this candid mantid. Join the cause and celebrate our partnership with the National Wildlife Federation by turning your garden into a certified wildlife habitat and by adding your own wildlife photos to the GrowIt! app with the hashtag: #Garden4Wildlife . . . . #Bugs #Mantis #Mantid #Entomology #Wildlife #CreepyCrawly #GrowIt #PlantNerd #bugsofinstagram #plantlove #plantlife #plantsarelife #Garden #GardenGeek #Grow #Nature #NWF #NationalWildlifeFederation #Gardenforwildlife #prayingmantis

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@nationalwildlife

A giant swallowtail butterfly gets a sip of nectar in a Texas backyard habitat. -------------------------------------------- “Seeing wildlife in our yards is a great indicator of the health of the local environment. In fact, the ongoing health of our communities is directly linked to the health of the wildlife with which we share our backyards, towns, and cities. Quite literally, the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat, depends on healthy local wildlife and the natural spaces where they live,” says Mary Phillips, Senior Director of Garden for Wildlife. “When you make simple changes to your outdoor spaces – from whole landscaped areas to a few planters – you are create stepping stones that help reconnect habitats for wildlife across the country.” Anyone, at any age, anywhere can participate in Garden for Wildlife Month with almost immediate positive results for wildlife. Participants can take an active role in potentially doubling the number of diverse local wildlife, while increasing the natural spaces within their communities. But that’s not all: Natural green spaces reduce urban temperatures, reduce water runoff and pollution, and provide a healing connection to nature. #Garden4Wildlife #butterflies #gardens #gardening #greenspaces #wildlife #outdoors #habitats #plants

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@growitmobile

May is #Garden4Wildlife Month! GrowIt! is proud to be teaming up with the National Wildlife Federation once again to promote the Garden for Wildlife program. It’s important to remember that our yards were habitats first! Check out the video to hear from David Mizejewski about how you can join our efforts. #food #water #cover #placetoraiseyoung #nativeplants #sustainablegardening. Add your wildlife gardening photos to GrowIt! With the hashtag #Garden4Wildlife, and think about having your garden certified as a wildlife habitat! #GrowIt! @nationalwildlife

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@epicyardfarm

This dragonfly mama is working hard to lay eggs in our natural garden pond. I think it is a Neon Skimmer (Libellula croceipennis). #naturalgardenpond #gardenpond #neonskimmer #libellulacroceipennis #certifiedwildlifehabitat #femaledragonfly #garden4wildlife #habita #gardenforwildlife at Tempe, Arizona

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@nationalwildlife

Speckled with morning dew, a tiny anole peeks over the lip of a pitcher plant, creating a vivid portrait. "He just went in and out, like he was going to sleep in there," says Anne Grimes, who watched the lizard from a photography shed she built in her North Carolina backyard. The yard is a National Wildlife Federation Certified Wildlife Habitat, where Grimes tends ponds and plants that nurture native wildlife. "It's a photographers' paradise," says Grimes. "But I spend more time watching than taking pictures." (Content sample from NWF’s #nationalwildlifemagazine) #anole #pitcherplant #lizard #gardenforwildlife #garden4wildlife #certifiedwildlifehabitat #photography

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@dmizejewski

Our green man is adorned in the finest gold, courtesy of blooming native Carolina jessamine vine. Spring has been slow coming, but she’s definitely here.

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@nationalwildlife

Insect decline is bad news for all animal species, including us humans. "We need insects. Nearly 40% of all animal species on Earth are herbivorous insects. They convert plants into food, in the form of themselves, for all other species." Here are a few ways you can love the bugs in your yard. 1. Learn to see insect activity in your yard as a positive sign of a healthy ecosystem. 2. Have your soil tested, plant the right plants for your soil and region, and make sure they have enough light and water because healthy plants are better able to fight off pests. 3. Become familiar with the insects in your yard, both good and bad. 4. Boost the beneficial insects in your yard because they’ll help control garden pests for free. 5. Attract birds to help control the pests. (Content sample from NWF’s #nationalwildlifemagazine, 📸: @claybolt) #insect #insects #bugs #gardenforwildlife #garden4wildlife #wildlife

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@nationalwildlife

Bees need our help. That’s why we’ve partnered with Beesponsible to shine a light on declining bee populations and to empower people everywhere to take action to help bees thrive. After you learn six ways you can help bees thrive, please share how you plan to help bees below with your #dontkillmybuzz post and tag @beesponsible. They’ll donate a dollar for each one to support our programs such as our bee-friendly garden efforts. Learn more at our blog – link in bio ⬆️ #bees #garden #gardening #nativeplants #pollinators #garden4wildlife

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@nationalwildlife

Did you know, not all bats eat insects? Sure, eating insects is by far the most common diet found among the 1,300 species of bats worldwide, however the pollinating role many of our nectar-feeding bats play is just as important. Scientists believe that many groups of plants have evolved to attract bats, as they are able to carry much larger amounts of pollen in their fur compared to other pollinators. The ability of bats to fly long distances is also another benefit to plants, especially those that occur in low densities or in habitats far apart from each other. Without nectar feeding bats not only would our environment suffer, but our way of living as well! #bat #bats #insects #nectar #pollen #pollinator #gardenforwildlife #garden4wildlife #wildlife

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@kcnpi

#Repost @nationalwildlife ・・・ Neonicotinoids were first marketed in the mid-1990s as safer alternatives to organophosphates and other pesticides widely used at the time. While neonics are indeed less toxic to birds and mammals than most of their predecessors, they can be more dangerous to bees and other pollinators. Unlike the majority of those older pesticides, “neonicotinoids are systemic, which means they can permeate every part of the plant, including its pollen and nectar,” explains Michigan State University entomologist David Smitley, who adds that the compounds may remain in a plant many weeks after treatment. Neonics also linger in the environment. “Bees and other wildlife can be exposed to harmful levels of these chemicals months to years after an application,” says Aimée Code, pesticide program director for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. To avoid neonics—found in hundreds of products, including sprays, granules, tree injections and soil drenches (pesticides applied to the base of plants)—carefully read labels. Steer clear of products that contain imidacloprid, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, clothianidin or thiamethoxam. (Content sample from NWF’s #nationalwildlifemagazine) #neonicotinoids #neonics #pollinators #bees #gardenforwildlife #garden4wildlife #dontkillmybuzz

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@nationalwildlife

Neonicotinoids were first marketed in the mid-1990s as safer alternatives to organophosphates and other pesticides widely used at the time. While neonics are indeed less toxic to birds and mammals than most of their predecessors, they can be more dangerous to bees and other pollinators. Unlike the majority of those older pesticides, “neonicotinoids are systemic, which means they can permeate every part of the plant, including its pollen and nectar,” explains Michigan State University entomologist David Smitley, who adds that the compounds may remain in a plant many weeks after treatment. Neonics also linger in the environment. “Bees and other wildlife can be exposed to harmful levels of these chemicals months to years after an application,” says Aimée Code, pesticide program director for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. To avoid neonics—found in hundreds of products, including sprays, granules, tree injections and soil drenches (pesticides applied to the base of plants)—carefully read labels. Steer clear of products that contain imidacloprid, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, clothianidin or thiamethoxam. (Content sample from NWF’s #nationalwildlifemagazine) #neonicotinoids #neonics #pollinators #bees #gardenforwildlife #garden4wildlife #dontkillmybuzz

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@wildonestc

Catherine Zimmerman discusses her film project Hometown Habitat, as well as the humble beginnings of her #nativeplant journey. www.themeadowproject.com for more information #designwithnature #wildonesmn #garden4wildlife #nativegarden #bringnaturehome #savethepollinators at University of St. Thomas

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@wildonestc

Great presentations by Jared Rosenbaum and Rachel Mackow of wildridgeplants.com on edible #nativeplants and #foraging . Yes, you can eat Common Milkweed and it is delicious! #designwithnature #wildonesmn #garden4wildlife #wildones #onlyinmn #boldnorth #nativegarden #gardenclub #eattheweeds at University of St. Thomas

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@plantsmap

Purple Reign, Tulips, Wabi-sabi gardening, Nature habitats and more: Growing Garden Trends 2018 | Plants Map #plantsmap #gardentrends #gardening #plants #landscapes #horticulture #nature #viburnum #garden4wildlife #birdyourworld

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@iheart__nature

Creating a backyard garden not only provides a habit for wildlife, but is a beautiful opportunity to educate our children on the simple actions we can take to restore our local environment. 🌿🦋🐞🐝 • How do you begin? Well, consider the basic needs of ALL living things: Food, water, and shelter. By simply adding water sources and food (flowers to provide nectar and pollen, seeds for birds, healthy soil for insects to thrive in...), you’re making a difference. For shelter, consider “nesting boxes” 💡search Google for ideas💡 • Living in an apartment? Setup a bird feeder and/or a #balconygarden. 🌺 The opportunity to make the planet a little better for us all is there, we just have to find it.

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@jeromeseraphimcraig

This post was reposted using @the.instasave.app #theinstasaveapp ・・・ "Backyard bird feeders are easy, convenient and available in a dizzying variety of sizes, styles and colors to suit any wildlife gardener’s tastes. But what can you do when feeders aren’t an option? Because of the mess feeders can make, some homeowners’ associations ban them. Feeders also may attract unwelcome nectar- and seed-stealing visitors, including squirrels, rats, raccoons or even large predators such as bears. And some backyard birders want to provide food but find it inconvenient to fill and clean feeders. Fortunately, there’s an easy solution—and it may even be better for birds. Natural foods such as shrubs, trees and other plants can be just as easy and convenient as feeders, and they provide additional benefits. “Plantings create more of an ecosystem, attracting a wider variety of birds,” says Kimberly Kaufman, executive director of the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in Ohio and co-author of the Kaufman Field Guide to Nature of the Midwest. “Flowers, trees and shrubs also provide cover and nesting habitat as well as important nectar for pollinators and host plants for butterflies and moths.” A wide variety of plants can nurture backyard birds: Nectar-rich flowers like bee balm, salvia and lupine are magnets for hummingbirds. Seed-bearing blooms, including coneflowers and cosmos, attract finches, sparrows, doves and quail. Jays are partial to nuts provided by trees such as hickories, pecans and walnuts, while fruit-loving birds, from orioles to waxwings, flock to sumacs, serviceberries, junipers and other berry bushes. Larger fruit trees, including crabapples and hollies, are top draws for grosbeaks, tanagers, catbirds and mockingbirds. (Content sample from NWF's #nationalwildlifemagazine) #bird #birdfeeder #gardening #gardenforwildlife #garden4wildlife"

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@gmartinezmolina

Backyard bird feeders are easy, convenient and available in a dizzying variety of sizes, styles and colors to suit any wildlife gardener’s tastes. But what can you do when feeders aren’t an option? Because of the mess feeders can make, some homeowners’ associations ban them. Feeders also may attract unwelcome nectar- and seed-stealing visitors, including squirrels, rats, raccoons or even large predators such as bears. And some backyard birders want to provide food but find it inconvenient to fill and clean feeders. Fortunately, there’s an easy solution—and it may even be better for birds. Natural foods such as shrubs, trees and other plants can be just as easy and convenient as feeders, and they provide additional benefits. “Plantings create more of an ecosystem, attracting a wider variety of birds,” says Kimberly Kaufman, executive director of the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in Ohio and co-author of the Kaufman Field Guide to Nature of the Midwest. “Flowers, trees and shrubs also provide cover and nesting habitat as well as important nectar for pollinators and host plants for butterflies and moths.” A wide variety of plants can nurture backyard birds: Nectar-rich flowers like bee balm, salvia and lupine are magnets for hummingbirds. Seed-bearing blooms, including coneflowers and cosmos, attract finches, sparrows, doves and quail. Jays are partial to nuts provided by trees such as hickories, pecans and walnuts, while fruit-loving birds, from orioles to waxwings, flock to sumacs, serviceberries, junipers and other berry bushes. Larger fruit trees, including crabapples and hollies, are top draws for grosbeaks, tanagers, catbirds and mockingbirds. (Content sample from NWF’s #nationalwildlifemagazine) #bird #birdfeeder #gardening #gardenforwildlife #garden4wildlife : @nationalwildlife

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@jilll.morris

Bonjour amigos!  Here is a photo from one of my beloved profiles. I am going to include the previous information below.  Have a great one! ((Backyard bird feeders are easy, convenient and available in a dizzying variety of sizes, styles and colors to suit any wildlife gardener’s tastes. But what can you do when feeders aren’t an option? Because of the mess feeders can make, some homeowners’ associations ban them. Feeders also may attract unwelcome nectar- and seed-stealing visitors, including squirrels, rats, raccoons or even large predators such as bears. And some backyard birders want to provide food but find it inconvenient to fill and clean feeders. Fortunately, there’s an easy solution—and it may even be better for birds. Natural foods such as shrubs, trees and other plants can be just as easy and convenient as feeders, and they provide additional benefits. “Plantings create more of an ecosystem, attracting a wider variety of birds,” says Kimberly Kaufman, executive director of the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in Ohio and co-author of the Kaufman Field Guide to Nature of the Midwest. “Flowers, trees and shrubs also provide cover and nesting habitat as well as important nectar for pollinators and host plants for butterflies and moths.” A wide variety of plants can nurture backyard birds: Nectar-rich flowers like bee balm, salvia and lupine are magnets for hummingbirds. Seed-bearing blooms, including coneflowers and cosmos, attract finches, sparrows, doves and quail. Jays are partial to nuts provided by trees such as hickories, pecans and walnuts, while fruit-loving birds, from orioles to waxwings, flock to sumacs, serviceberries, junipers and other berry bushes. Larger fruit trees, including crabapples and hollies, are top draws for grosbeaks, tanagers, catbirds and mockingbirds. (Content sample from NWF's #nationalwildlifemagazine) #bird #birdfeeder #gardening #gardenforwildlife #garden4wildlife))

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@andyscottcs

Windy windy today, but Little Bluestem keeps holding on - is #copper still a trending color? #Garden4wildlife #leavetheleaves #nativeplant #nativegarden #savethebees #savethemonarchs #wintergarden at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

So it's Cyber Monday - mosey on over to teespring.com/prairieup and check out our #prairie swag! Created in collaboration with @monarchgardensbenjaminvogt they're unisex and available in 6 colors. Perfect for #gardeners and those passionate about North American conservation! #prairieup #teeshirt #tshirt #cybermonday #giftideas #giftsforher #giftsforhim #nativebees #savethebees #savethemonarchs #Garden4wildlife #onlyinmn #nebraska

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@andyscottcs

Echinacea angustifolia & Indian Grass #onlyinmn #fallcolors #Garden4wildlife

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@andyscottcs

American Cranberry Bush - Toss out your Burning Bush for this! #Garden4wildlife #fallcolors

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@andyscottcs

#Monarch filling up on native Tall Thistle; good luck, friend! #Garden4wildlife #pollinatorhero #supergeneration #prairieup #gardensofinstagram at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@dmizejewski

Fatty catty about to turn into a butterfly.

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@andyscottcs

...maybe I will plant Tall Thistle again... #pollinatorhero #nativeplant #Garden4wildlife at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

MORE Painted Ladies...how many can you count? 😜 #Garden4wildlife #pollinatorhero #plantnatives #minnesotagardens at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

Bottle Gentian's first time blooming in my woodland garden...Bees have to work hard to pry the petals open (although some cheat and chew small holes to the nectaries). Nice burst of color while most everything else is fading 👍 #gardensofinstagram #nativeplant #Garden4wildlife #beesnative #minnesotagarden at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

A Painted Lady kind of morning...loads of them on Tall Thistle, Goldenrod & Joe Pye #Garden4wildlife #pollinators #pollinatorparadise #pollinatorgarden #NOtoNeonics #beesnative at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

Native Tall Thistle doin it's thing... #Garden4wildlife at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

Amazing greeting outside the door this morning...HUGE #Monarch eclosing...one of the largest i've seen! #savethemonarchs #Garden4wildlife

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@andyscottcs

Nodding Trillium seeds...dispersed by ants who eat the fatty elaiosome...take 'em away! 🐜🐜🐜 #Garden4wildlife #naturalgardens #bugsarefriends at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

#sorrynotsorry , so obsessed with our Joe Pye rn! Bees gone crazy 😜 #beesnative #Garden4wildlife at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

So excited this bloomed it's 1st season; @prairiemoonnursery , bare root Hibiscus laevis ❤️🌸 #nativeplant #pollinatorhero #NOtoNeonics #Garden4wildlife at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

Tachinid Flies, Predatory Stinkbugs, Assassin Bugs, spiders, wasps...just a few of the many trials Monarch Caterpillars face during their fleeting larval stage...let's not give them any more to worry about #NOtoNeonics #Garden4wildlife #plantnatives #growmilkweed @nativescapes.ma @monarchjointventure @monarchgardensbenjaminvogt at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

...and Jewel Weed, too! #Garden4wildlife #savethebees #nativeplant at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

Aralia racemosa...so many berries! #garden4wildlife at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

Clouded Sulphur and Skippers living for Liatris... #Garden4wildlife at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@andyscottcs

2016 throwback images from the prairie boulevard garden (second year). #garden4wildlife #NOtoNeonics at Bloomington, Minnesota

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@cultivatingcuriosities

Insect critters enjoying my garden. #RedAphids

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