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CBC Marketplace

Marketplace is Canada's highest-rated consumer affairs show. We've got your back. Watch Fridays at 8 p.m. ET on CBC-TV.

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A Toronto plastic surgeon known online as Dr. 6ix could face a class-action lawsuit over allegations that he breached the privacy rights of patients by recording them — sometimes in a state of undress — without their consent using surveillance cameras inside his clinic.

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👓👓👓 You know those blue-light filtering lenses that some optical stores claim could prevent everything from fatigue and eye strain to retina damage and macular degeneration caused by blue light from digital devices? Doctors say those claims aren’t true. Bottom line: You don’t need them. 🚫 • For our investigation into those marketing claims we spoke to Dr. Sunir Garg, an eye surgeon and spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. • He says if your eyes don’t feel right after looking at a screen for a long period of time, it’s not because of blue light. It’s actually because you’re not blinking as often and it causes the eye to dry out and become irritated. • His advice is to blink more and take a break. Every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break and look 20 feet off into the distance. • As for those claims connecting blue light from digital screens to retina damage? Dr. Garg says there’s no evidence that blue light from screens can cause serious damage like macular degeneration or other eye diseases. • However, blue light can keep us awake. He suggests powering down from digital devices before bedtime. If you want to preserve the health of your eyes, he says the best thing to do is take breaks, eat a healthy balanced diet, exercise and don’t smoke. • Watch our investigation Why you don’t need blue light lenses: Hidden camera investigation, tonight at 8 p.m. on CBC TV and Gem. • • • Video by @cbcmarketplace | Photo courtesy of Shutterstock | Reporting by Tyana Grundig, Jeannie Stiglic, Makda Ghebreslassie and Charlsie Agro #marketplace #eyes #bluelight #glasses #vision #lenses

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Our hidden camera footage reveals how staff at four leading optical chains make claims about blue light filtering lenses that experts say are not proven. • We visited multiple Hakim Optical, Vogue Optical, Hudson's Bay Optical (operated by Glasses Gallery) and LensCrafters locations in southern Ontario and were told that blue light from our devices could damage our retinas, and lead to serious eye diseases such as macular degeneration. • Dr. Rahul Khurana, a spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, told Marketplace there’s no evidence to back up these claims. • The lenses are said to protect wearers from blue light coming from our digital screens. • “Blue light fear, paranoia, is really out there,” he said. “But there’s no evidence to show it’s truly dangerous and blocking it has not ever [been] shown to [have] any benefits.” • All the companies say the science is still evolving and that blue light can be damaging. • Some companies tell us they’ll reinforce their staff training. The makers of the lenses stand by their marketing. • Read our report online and watch the episode tonight at 8 p.m. on @CBC TV/Gem/YouTube • Video by @cbcmarketplace | Reporting by Tyana Grundig, Makda Ghebreslassie, and Jeannie Stiglic #bluelight #glasses #optical #lens #shopping

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Have you cut milk out of your diet? • This might look like it could be a meal. In fact, it’s what a person who drinks just one glass of milk a day would have to add to their existing diet to meet Health Canada’s recommended calcium intake. • Experts tell us if your plate isn’t packed with lots of dark greens, seeds and nuts, you’re probably not getting enough calcium. • That’s because many Canadians are shying away from drinking cow’s milk for ethical, environmental and health reasons. • Our investigation found that if you ditch the dairy, it’s not that easy to make up for the nutrients you’re missing. • We spent months analyzing nutrition studies, interviewing doctors and dietitians, and reviewing the Kim family’s food diaries. • Swipe to see what a day's worth of food looked like for one family member. • Most non-dairy food items have calcium concentrations that are relatively low, so you have to eat them in large quantities to meet the requirements. • The results suggest that giving up milk altogether could lead to deficiencies in essential nutrients like calcium, vitamin D and protein, if you’re not making very conscious efforts to fill the void. • • • Photo by: CBC Marketplace | #milk #alternativemilk #dairyfree #plantbased #almondmilk #soymilk #oatmilk #coconutmilk #cowmilk #health #nutrition #cbc #cbcnews #cbcmarketplace

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Should you be stirring coconut oil into your coffee? • This ultra-popular health food product has more saturated fat than butter and lard. • Yet it’s routinely marketed as a “superfood” or a “healthy fat.” • Marie-Pierre St-Onge is a human nutrition expert based in New York. Her research is often used by big brands and social media influencers to make these health claims. • She authored the 2003 study that spurred the coconut oil health craze. • But she was studying medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), not coconut oil, as a way of combating the obesity epidemic. • “It’s unfortunate that coconut oil has been given this health halo,” St-Onge said. • In fact, she says only 15 per cent of coconut oil contains MCT. The rest is your typical saturated fat, which science has linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. • Asked if coconut oil is healthy, St-Onge replied she wouldn’t consume it on a regular basis. • • • Video by: CBC Marketplace | #coconutoil #mctoil #health #nutrition #healthfood #saturatedfat #butter #science #research #cbc #cbcnews #cbcmarketplace

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Do noisy restaurants bother you? This restaurant owner was worried the noise in his restaurant could affect his business. So he turned to experts to make sure customers would keep coming back.

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We wanted to see how noise can impact your health, so we went to Rick Neitzel, an exposure scientist at the University of Michigan, to find out. • He says it's best not to be exposed to more than an average of 70 decibels a day or you'll risk hearing loss over time. • But while it might not be a surprise that prolonged exposure to noise could permanently alter your hearing, did you know it could have an impact on your heart, too? • Neitzel says that even lower amounts of noise over a 24-hour period could lead to health hazards, including heart attacks, hypertension, cognitive effects and potentially, mental health impacts. • "When we talk about these cardiovascular impacts — hypertension and heart attacks — we're talking more down in the 45- to 55-decibel range as a 24-hour average," he said. • To explain how this works in action, Neitzel tested Marketplace co-host Makda Ghebreslassie's blood pressure before and after a noise test. • After the sound was played at 90 decibels for 30 seconds, her blood pressure went up to from 110/93 to 120/95, and her pulse went up from 89 to 96. • For the full story, watch our Marketplace investigation on CBC TV, YouTube, and CBC Gem. • Video by: Norm Arnold | Reporting by Makda Ghebreslassie

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If restaurant noise bothers you, you’re not alone. ️ • We wanted to hear from you, so we sent out an online questionnaire asking viewers what they think about noise levels in restaurants. • Nearly 1,500 people responded and 91 per cent said they believe restaurants are getting louder. Sixty-three per cent of respondents said they have left a restaurant because it was too noisy. • Using the SoundPrint app, we then measured the noise levels at some of the large chain restaurants identified by respondents in our questionnaire in different locations across Canada. • To find out the results and see what one restaurant owner is doing to reduce noise, watch our episode “Are noisy restaurants harmful to your health?" tonight at 8 p.m. on CBC-TV, Gem or YouTube. • • • Photos: Shutterstock, Reporting by @makdagheb, Caitlin Taylor and Greg Sadler | #restaurants #food #foodie #noisyrestaurants #citylife #investigation #cbcmarketplace

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We tested 11 pairs of basketball shoes from Adidas, Nike and Under Armour to find out if the steep price tag and hype really impact performance. cbc.ca/1.5343053

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Do high-priced shoes help basketball players perform better on the court? • When the Raptors clinched the 2019 NBA Finals, Kyle Lowry was wearing the Adidas Harden Vol. 3. • Some players say their shoes are “everything.” • “I’m nothing without my shoes,” forward Malcolm Miller said. • Performance basketball shoes from big brands can come with a steep price tag, ranging from less than $100 to close to $300. • We put that to the test. • We bought 11 pairs of shoes from Adidas, Nike and Under Armour, and commissioned biomechanists to test whether price affects performance. • Watch our episode “Are expensive shoes worth it? Testing Adidas, Nike, Under Armour” on Gem or YouTube to find out which models outperformed the rest. • • • Video by: CBC Marketplace | #shoes #basketballshoes #sneakers #basketball #torontoraptors #raptors #NBA #sport #performance #adidas #nike #underarmour #cbc #cbcnews #cbcmarketplace

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Which of these basketball shoes do you think will perform best on the court? • We tested 11 sneakers from Nike, Adidas and Under Armour to see if there’s really a difference between the high, middle and low price points of models. • The shoes ranged in price from $80 to $240, and some were endorsed by NBA stars like LeBron James and Stephen Curry. • Watch the episode Friday at 8 p.m. on CBC-TV and Gem to find out if a higher price tag affects performance. • • • Photos by: David MacIntosh/CBC | #shoes #basketballshoes #sneakers #adidas #nike #underarmour #NBA #basketball #sports #cbc #cbcnews #cbcmarketplace

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Jayden Trudell was viciously assaulted from behind by a group of students just off school property last year. • He was punched in the head, picked up and dropped headfirst into the pavement before being continually punched and kicked on the ground. The responding police officers thought he was dead. • The 15-year-old has spent the last year recovering from the surprise attack, and moved schools to ensure his safety. • A CBC Marketplace survey reveals the attack is part of a larger problem of violence in Canadian schools. • WARNING: This story contains graphic details and violent video.

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Albigail Wieffering holds up a poster she made as part of a public awareness campaign about sexual harassment and assault. • She participated in a “slut walk” to protest sexual violence, victim blaming and a local high school's decision to allow a male student accused of sexual assault back into school with his accusers. • Wieffering says young women who experience sexual violence should be believed when they report it. • When CBC News and Marketplace commissioned a groundbreaking survey into school violence, including physical and sexual abuse, some of the results were startling. • More than one in seven girls surveyed said they've had a sexual act forced upon them, including oral sex or being forced to touch someone in a sexual manner. • "That's an appalling statistic," says Tracy Vaillancourt, a violence prevention expert at the University of Ottawa. • What concerns me is that people [will] dismiss this number … because they think it's too high and that can't be possible. And yet it is possible." • Catch up on all our reporting about violence in Canadian schools at cbc.ca/news/schoolviolence. • Photos by Lindsay Bird | Reporting by David Common, Anu Singh, Caitlin Taylor, Valerie Ouellet

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These are just some of the things students told us when we asked what happened when they reported a violent incident to their school. • We wanted to learn more about what students face every day when they walk the halls of their schools. • So we went to students directly, and commissioned a survey of more than 4,000 young people, asking about their experiences with physical and sexual violence, homophobia and racism — from kindergarten to grade 12. • The survey revealed some sobering statistics, including that more than one-third of students between the ages of 14 and 21 say they were physically assaulted at least once before reaching high school. • Watch our exclusive investigation: School Violence: Fighting for safer schools, tonight at 8 p.m. ET on @cbc TV and Gem. • Reporting by David Common, Anu Singh, Caitlin Taylor, Valérie Ouellet | #school #violence #bullying #metoo #highschool #realtalk #teen #girl #boy

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Livia sells a cute device promising to reduce your period pain. But with a hefty price tag, does it work any better than what’s currently on the market, for less than half the price?

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You’re supposed to have one credit score, right? So why did each of these companies give this man a different one? He’s not the only one it happened to.

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How did this consumer get four different credit scores from four different companies? We asked Michael Deng to test these four credit score providers. • Our investigation found that the same consumer is likely to get different credit scores from different websites — and chances are that none of those scores matches the one lenders are most likely to consult when deciding your financial fate. • Multiple lenders told us they use a Beacon score, now known as a FICO score in Canada. • But Canadian consumers cannot access their FICO score on their own. • They have to do a hard credit check — which unlike the “soft” credit check on the four websites Deng tested — can have a negative effect on your credit score. • Still, all four companies say the scores they give consumers are used by lenders. • But check out the fine print. It says these scores may not actually be used by your lender and they’re for educational use. • Watch our investigation, Should you trust your credit score? tonight at 8 p.m. on @cbc TV and Gem. • • • Photo by: CBC Marketplace | Reporting by Jeannie Stiglic, Jenny Cowley and Asha Tomlinson #cbcmarketplace #creditscores #finance #money #credit

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What did it take to go undercover and expose illegal activity in the recycling trade? And how did we put tracking devices into massive bales of plastic meant for recycling? Our team breaks down our plastics investigation.

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