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Squat University

Dr. Aaron Horschig's guide 📚empowering you to ⬇️pain, optimize performance & find your TRUE STRENGTH 🏋🏼‍♂️💪🏼 ⤵️Link to external/internal rot vid🔥🔥

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Patience is something all of us could use a little more of - especially when it comes to lifting. It’s so easy nowadays to get so focused on HOW MUCH weight is on the bar because you’re always seeing others lift tremendous weight across social media. But let’s be real, most elite athletes aren’t posting videos of their warm ups ... so you’re only seeing a fraction and tiny “snapshot” of what really goes on in their training. You don’t see the YEARS of grinding it took to get where they are today.🏋🏼‍♀️ . When you get so focused on HOW MUCH is on the bar you lose sight of HOW WELL you’re moving - which can lead to injury & teach your body how that it’s okay to move poorly under weight (motor learning 101). However when you focus on perfecting your technique & combine that mindset with a hard work ethic - the big weight will come. Have patience. ____________________________________________ This is the 229th #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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Have you been told to “shrug up” when you catch a snatch? What if I told you this is less than ideal?🤔 . You see, as your arm moves overhead your shoulder blade (called your scapula) moves as well to support the arm. This upward rotation gives stability to the shoulder joint, allow it to eternally rotate and safely maintain heavy weights overhead. However, if you shrug upwards you excessively elevate the shoulder blade by over recruiting your upper trap muscle. This does two things.👇🏼📝 . First, shrugging leads to a less stable position for the shoulder joint and can lead to easily dumping the shoulder complex into a poor internally rotated position. External rotation allows for this ideal stacked and stable foundation.🏋🏼‍♀️ . The shrugged hold also ends up being a “muscled position” instead of one that relies on the bodies natural support system. Think about it like this. If you’re going to hold the barbell overhead for a set of walking lunges or overhead farmer walks, which will tire you out more quickly: shrugging upwards or squeezing your shoulder blades together.🤔 . Don’t think about shrugging but instead keep your shoulder blades down and pulled together. This will distribute the load of the barbell more evenly across a firm foundation, improving stability and keeping your shoulder joint safe.✅ . Shout out to 2x Olympian @olychad for the collaboration in making this post as well to @3D4Medical and their app Complete Anatomy for the visual of the body.🙏🏼 . For more on why “external rotation” VS “internal rotation” cuing at this position, check out the YouTube video linked in my bio.📲 _____________________________________ This is the 228th #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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Today I want to break down the technique of this 419 lb (190kg) 3x bodyweight deadlift.🤯 . The most important factor for a powerful pull is an efficient set up and start position. Notice how Kelly starts by setting her feet, and grabs the ground to create a stable foundation for the rest of your body.🦶🏼 . Her arm movement next is a little more dynamic than I would recommend for most. She’s using this movement to create tension in her entire upper body before she locks her arms in place and begins the pull. Now, this arm sequence is something you’ll see in some athletes (@toshikis170j210 shown here) as a way to prime sufficient stiffness much like “revving a cars engine,” but Id recommend most slow this down, lock & then lift ensure proper set up and avoid jerking the bar too quickly.📝 . The action of pre-tensioning also engages the powerful lat muscles of the back. These are strong powerful muscles that when turned on create torso stiffness and work to keep the bar close to the body for an efficient pull that wont drift away.✅ . As the bar moves you can see she drives her knees out to the side while keeping her feet stable, creating a ton of external rotation torque at the hip joint. This sets her legs into a stable position for efferent leg drive while her back remains locked in a great stable position for the remainder of the pull.✅ . Shout out to @kellywild8 for being todays athlete model, @scottindaberks of @cal_strength in the collaboration for today’s video and @3d4medical with the Complete Anatomy app for the visual of the body.🙏🏼 __________________________________________ This is the 227th #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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I saw a quote once that read, “you can easily judge the character of someone by how they treat others who can do nothing for them.” Food for thought. . I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comment section below. Hope you all have a great weekend🙏🏼 ___________________________________________ This is the 226th #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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Is the Jefferson curl exercise something you should be using, let’s give some context to this discussion.📝 . If your goal is to pull heavy weight from the ground during a deadlift for example, you want your back to be held in a stable unwavering position. During the Olympic lifts, a stable back allows you transfer the power you derive from the legs through the core and into pulling the barbell for a successful lift.🏋🏼‍♀️ . When the back loses stability and beings to move under load as we pull, it’s called an “energy leak.” Think about it like this, if I throw a baseball at a wall. The balls structure remains in tact and the energy from the ball hitting the wall creates an equal reaction in making the ball bounce back. However, if I throw a ball of spaghetti at the wall, the structure of the original ball deforms as it hits the wall. The energy is dissipated and the spaghetti does not bounce back. This means allowing the back to round under load hinders our ability to move efficiently (as energy is “bleeding out” of the body into the end goal) thus hurts performance.🤯 . Think of every possible exercise as a tool in your tool box, we want to take out the ones that help us accomplish our end goal. In this context for strength athletes the Jefferson would be far less efficient than the classic RDL or Romanian deadlift to build a resilient back for pulling.✅ . Shout out to @shift_movementscience for demonstrating the Jefferson curl today and @great_white_north_juggernaut & @lee_sang____ for demonstrating the pulls 🙏🏼 ___________________________________________ This is the 225th #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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Do you wind up with tight and stiff hip flexors after heavy squat days? Have you tried foam rolling or laying on a lacrosse ball for minutes on end but never wind up with any long term relief? It may be time for a different approach.👇🏼🔥 . The hip flexors are actually a group of two muscles that combine to form your Iliopsoas. This muscle can often become stiff and spasm, not because its tight and needs to be stretched but because it is weak and trying to bring stability to an area.✅ . Strengthening the hip flexors with the resisted dead bug exercise can be a great first step. Brace your core and kick each leg for and 5 second hold in the extended position. Placing your hands under your low back can help cue you to keep it from flattening out into your hand or over arching as you move your legs. Try 2-3 sets of 5 reps for a 5 second hold of each.✅ . Next, try the side plank clam shell to help strengthen the near by lateral glutes. (Those who develop hip flexor issues often have weak and unstable lateral hip muscles like the glute medius). Assume the side plank while you open your leg and hold for 5 seconds. Don’t rotate too far or you’ll be compensating with your low back. Try 2-3 sets of 10 reps for a 5 second hold.✅ . Last, focus on creating a ton of tension in your core during each lift. Take a big breath and tension your core muscles as hard as you can before each rep. Improving the strength of your hip flexors and lateral hip muscles along with cues for proper core stability when under the bar should allow you to fix your symptoms.🙌🏼🏋🏼‍♀️ . Shout out to Dr. Stefanie Cohen (@steficohen) for being today's athlete model and to @3D4Medical with their app Complete Anatomy for the visual of the body.🙌🏼 . To learn more about dealing with hip flexor issues, check out the blog post linked in my bio!📲 _____________________________________ This is the 224th #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc).

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Let’s talk pause squats. The goal with a pause squat is to develop and solidify your mobility, comfort and strength in the bottom position. A pause squat requires you to expose and fix weak links you may have in “owning” this part of the squat movement.📝 . For the Olympic lifter or CrossFitter, the pause squat (in either the front or overhead position) will help you become more comfortable and efficient in the receiving position for your snatch or clean. The deeper you can catch both of these lifts (and change direction while staying balanced) the more weight you can eventually hope to lift. Most athletes fail to efficiently catch their snatch or clean as deep as they should until the weight gets heavy, and when they do they usually have to compensate by turning their toes out or collapsing their back due to a lack of comfort in this deep position.🏋🏼‍♀️ . When you pause, you lose the explosive power assistance your body naturally gets from a quick turnaround – making the ascent more difficult. But that’s the point. This is why pause squats give the Olympic lifter a little more insurance that they wont get buried under a heavy lift as it will help build the strength necessary to rise from the bottom position.✅ . If you haven’t performed pause squats before, start with 50% of your best squat and hold the bottom position for a minimum of 5 seconds. As you sit in the deep position, try to relax your quads and hamstrings to really sink as deep as possible while maintaining a braced core. IIf doing a longer pause, you can take small sips of air in and out but don’t completely let the air out of your lungs or you will lose sufficient tension in your core. Over time the goal is to progress in time and load.🙌🏼✅ . Shout out to Olympian Chad Vaughn @olychad for his collaboration in making this post today! If you aren't follwoing Chad across social media, get on it!🙏🏼 _____________________________________ This is the 223rd #SquatUclub eligible post!! “Like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc).

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A little spin on the classic Bruce Lee quote “I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but the man who practiced 1 kick 10,000 times.” Obviously when it comes to weightlifting there are a ton of different variations that athletes use to hit different weaknesses in their main lifts (and they definitely have their value) but at the end of the day, you only compete in the classic snatch and clean & jerk lifts. The goal with the post isn’t to dismiss the importance of variation but to highlight the need to master the basics in order to produce excellence in performance.✅ . I’d love to hear your thoughts below in the comment section👇🏼👇🏼 ____________________________________________ This is the 222nd #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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Jake @hartmanstrength came to me with an issue in his squat (as you can see) and some hip pain that was deep under the right glute where the hamstrings run and attach. The first thing I wanted to see during our visit was how he was moving and if we slow-mo the squat you can see he shifts away from the painful hip on the descent. He also didn’t have any significant side to side mobility differences.📝 . When I assessed his single leg squat, watch what happens to his right knee (it’s harder to control compared to the left). When I looked at his hip extension coordination with the single leg bridge screen, he could easily feel his left glute working hard but his right hamstring dominated the movement (again another imbalance).📝 . We started a hip thruster with hold, squeezing the glutes hard for 5 seconds and followed it with some touch down squats on each leg to improve coordination and stability.✅ . He then kept the hip circle from @mbslingshot on for some slow controlled bodyweight squats, focusing on a balanced descent, and then did the same with his first set of barbell squats, and as you can see, it looks much more balanced in the bottom now.🙌🏼 . A week later he was able to hit 465 with much less pain, and a few weeks after that 575 without any pain at all!🏋🏼‍♀️ . Shout out to @hartmanstrength for putting in the work to fix this problem, @mbslingshot for the hip circles used today & to @3d4medical With the Complete Anatomy app for the visual of the body🙏🏼 ___________________________________________ This is the 221st #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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One of my favorite warm up exercises prior to lifting is the band pull apart, but why would you want to use it?🤔 . If we look at the muscles that lie on the upper back, the mid trap and low trap as well as the rhomboids work together to set the shoulder blades in a stable retracted position. This action is what we use to create a strong and stable upper back when setting the barbell on the back for a back squat or even when getting under the bar for bench press as elite powerlifter Kelly Branton @great_white_north_juggernaut is demonstrating here.✅ . The band pull apart can help prime this action when warming up to help you groove this stable upper back. When performing, don’t just pull the band apart with your arms, but instead set your shoulder blades back and down and pinch them together as you simultaneously pull the band apart. This will also limit any unwanted shrugging that will emphasize the often overactive upper traps. Hold the end position for 5-10 seconds and start with 10 reps.📝 . As always, assess how you feel pulling yourself under the barbell after performing to see if this is a good warm up for your body.🙌🏼 . If you’d like to see a few other upper body stability drills I like to use as warm ups and as rehab with some shoulder injuries, check out the blog article linked in my bio📲 . Shout out to @great_white_north_juggernaut & @lee_sang____ for being today’s athlete models & @3d4medical with the Complete Anatomy app for the visual of the body🙏🏼 __________________________________________ This is the 220th #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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Do you currently have or in the past had shoulder pain when lifting…have you been told to use this exercise called the “empty can” to strengthen your rotator cuff? This is actually a very poor exercise to perform for that purpose, here’s why.❌👇🏼 . Both the “empty can” and “full can” exercises are designed to target the rotator cuff muscles. The rotator cuff is a group of 4 small muscles that lie close to the joint and provide stability for the shoulder as it moves. The joint is then covered by the larger deltoid muscles.👍🏼 . The downside to the “empty can” exercise is that it recruits the deltoid muscle to a greater degree which pulls the humerus upwards and increases chances of impingement. This is why this exercise often brings out pain in those who are currently dealing with a shoulder injury.❌🥊 . I recommend instead using the “full can” exercise and even holding one arm still while the other performs the movement and vice versa. This variation is a much more efficient way to address strengthening the rotator cuff without risk of continuing your injury.✅ . If you’d like to learn more of my favorite ways to strength and stabilize the shoulder, check out the blog article linked in my bio📲 . Shout out to Jordan Weichers (@jordanweichers) for being today's athlete model and @3d4medical with their app Complete Anatomy for the visual of the body. ___________________________________ This is the 219th #SquatUclub eligible post!! Remember everyday - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub ASAP and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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Tag a friend who you think would love to read & review my 1st book! I'm going to pick (2) groups of 2 to give away free copies & send them out within the next few weeks. YOU and your ONE FRIEND you tag .... GO! _______________________________ My book ‘The Squat Bible’ was released in March of 2017 & can be found all around the world on Amazon.com for those that still want to pick up a copy but don’t win today’s giveaway! __________________________________________ This is still a #SquatUclub eligible post! Remember from here on out - “like,” & comment using the hashtag #squatUclub as fast as possible when a new post goes up and I’ll pick one person to start working with on whatever help you need (squat technique, an achy hip with deadlifts, etc). TURNING ON post notifications at the top of my profile (click the •••) will help you be first in line each day!

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