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Wex W

An urban farmer finding beauty in nature and a cup of coffee• One half of @hyggesg

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13/10/17 Rows of Marigold, Balsam and Cassava overlooking the rice fields in Ubud. Because flower offerings are a daily ritual, locals grow flowers of various colours (each colour of different symbolic meaning) where they can. The sheer volume of flowers that are grown for this sole purpose must be staggering, but the daily sacrifice of Canang Sari assembly for Hindus serves as a reminder of the impermanence of life.

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13/10/17 Hues of mulberry, grown along a thin strip of ground next to an irrigation ditch.

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13/10/17 Eggplants that were growing really well given the irrigation ditches that carried water from the local river.

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13/10/17 If there was a favourite flower in Bali, Mexican Marigolds (Tagetes erecta) would be it. Used in garlands, flower offerings in front of homes or store fronts, water features, or even in food, these were so commonplace in culture you'd probably mistake it for a local flower (native to Latin America). These were grown on the farm where we stayed, and in the dying light of day, it's not difficult to see why they're so well-loved.

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13/10/17 Tengenungan Waterfall, Ubud.

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13/10/17 🌸

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13/10/17 Probably the first thing that hits you in Bali. From landscaping, decor or food, to the daily offering of Canang sari to give thanks for peace, flowers are definitely a big part of everyday life here. This scene spotted in a Hindu temple, a simple arrangement but a sight to admire.

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12/10/17 Third time back in Bali and this time with @ieatpuffin in tow. Definitely more tourists and vehicles now than pre-eat, pray, love, but there remains an unhurried charm, a tasteful weaving of greenery into any pockets of urban spaces, and a healthy respect for nature, culture and tradition. This #sunset was over an unused Padi near a tourist street in Seminyak, probably a good encapsulation of how Bali has developed quickly in recent years.

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6/10/17 Kiwano, or Horned melon, a fruit native to Sub-Saharan Africa, finally ripening on vine. The green flesh has the texture of a cucumber-like passionfruit, but taste somewhere between a citrus and melon. This first batch was grown from leftover seeds from fruits brought back from South Africa, but could have grown better. Going to seed-save for more batches.

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6/10/17 Beautiful foliage of Common Rue (Ruta graveolens), a pungent and bitter herb that is toxic when consumed in large amounts. No longer as commonly used in modern cuisine, Rue was apparently heavily used in witchcraft and a common way to recognise a witch in the Middle ages. At the farm, these are entirely pest-free and chicken-repellent.

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6/10/17 Three's a crowd. The passionfruit vines have been allowed to settle in for 3 months (after untangling, heavy pruning, before sprawling them out on the trellis), and are really taking to the crazy alternating monsoon season weather. Three different varieties growing and this one has been fruiting the most so far.

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6/10/17 Purple starch corn pollen, or bee fodder.

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6/10/17 Tuscan or Dinosaur Kale growing well in a partially-shaded spot on the farm. The lower leaves have been ravaged by free-ranging chickens, but the leaves higher up on the stem are good proof that this hardy Brassica is definitely viable in the tropical heat.

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6/10/17 One of the varieties of bittergourd (or bitter melon) growing at work. The squirrels have found the tastier food sources and are coming back daily now. Not sure if that's a good thing.

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6/10/17 Started from a salvaged stem cutting from a project, how this Purple Basil has grown under @yendis_auhc's watch.

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6/10/17 First fruits on the Jambu shrub at work after transplanting by the kids from APSN Katong 6 months back. Monsoon season also means perfect weather for fruiting trees, with lots of moisture after bouts of intense heat. The full-grown Jambu tree outside the farm is literally covered in pink fruits.

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6/10/17 The bush beans have found their way up the corn stalks in the three sisters patch, an ingenious method of cultivation first practiced by the native Indians to grow important parts of their diet interdependently (Maize, Beans, Squash) in the same plot. Can't wait to see these beans as they're supposedly speckled white and red.

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6/10/17 Tassle formation on the latest batch of purple starch corn growing in the three sisters patch. The tassles are actually the male part that give rise to pollen, which will eventually fertilize the silks (female part) below to give corn. Interestingly, maize belongs to a genus of grass called Zea (hence the resemblance), and was first cultivated in its earliest form when our human ancestors first discovered mutant strains with nutritious starchy cobs. Always a good sign seeing these.

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